Operation Ice Storm Clean Up – FAQs

When?

The City of Toronto will begin cleaning up the thousands of downed tree limbs that fell as a result of the ice storm on January 3. The cleanup operation, which is expected to take approximately eight weeks, will begin simultaneously in wards across the city. Residents may monitor the debris removal progress by checking a detailed map on the City’s web site at http://www.toronto.ca.

Who?

While City forestry crews continue to tend to overhead branches that are a safety hazard, Solid Waste Management will lead the collection and chipping of wood debris piled on city streets. Up to 125 three-person crews made up of both City staff and contractors will clear tree debris from roadsides using chain saws and chippers while another 120 two-person forestry crews will focus on removing hanging branches that threaten power lines and walking areas. The City has committed more than 600 people including contractors to this effort. The plan is a coordinated approach by Solid Waste Management Services; Transportation Services; Parks, Forestry & Recreation; and Toronto Water.

What will the City do?

The City will haul away all tree branches from front yards and roadsides and will include those that have fallen on private property if they are less than 15 cm (six inches) in diameter and have been taken to the curb. Residents should neatly stack limbs/branches at the front edge of their properties without blocking either sidewalks or roads and with the butt ends of branches towards the road.

What residents should do?

Residents should neatly stack limbs/branches at the front edge of their properties without blocking either sidewalks or roads and with the butt ends of branches towards the road.

What the City will not do?

City crews will not collect large limbs (more than 15 cm or six inches in diameter) from private trees that have fallen on private property. Property owners should contact a private contractor for this. A City permit is not required to remove damaged or downed trees that are hazardous, however many trees can be saved with proper care and pruning.

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